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big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
. it is a struggle of a lifetime. to redeem the soul of america. we still need to find a way to humanize our political institution, our businesses, and our system of education. 50 years later, those of us educated to the full -- calls of justice, need to appease ourselves. our struggle is an ongoing struggle. there will be progress. there will also be setbacks. we must continue to have hope and be still in our faith that this nation will become a truly multiracial democracy. we must continue to work. we must not give up or give in. keep the faith. and people hurting and suffering, we must be ready to take action, cast our votes, and move our feet. we must have a sense of urgency to use the power rented us to help end human suffering. we as a people and a congress understand our differences do not divide us. we will be at our best when we accept that we are one people, one american family, that we all live in the same house. the american house, the world house. understand that no one, but no one, is breathless. everyone can make a contribution. the march on washington is saying to us today th
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
, and what i often call apartheid in the southern part of the united states of america. so if you look at was going on from 1876 to 1895, in that 20 year period we saw the beginning of the end of full citizenship of african-americans in this country. so by the time robert smalls died in 1950, he died brokenhearted, and financially, not near as well off as he once was. and so i have spent a lot of time talking about the history of this. as i used to say to my students when i taught, if it happened before it can happen again. and we see all the speculation about what the supreme court is going to do with the most important civil rights act, which i think was the voting rights act of 1965. and most experts think that that's about to come to a significant, and i call, a noble end. oh grams of affirmative action, that simply means you're going to take positive steps. you can't be passive. you've got to take positive steps to overcome the current effects of past discrimination, the history. not going to happen by itself. if you bring that to a close, and people are speculating that that is a
system now? what can be done to pull america out of this tepid period of growth? we are joined by incredible experts on the panel. mohammed el-erian, ceo of pacific investment management company. sheila bair, senior adviser to charitable trusts. john taylor, professor of economics at stanford university and senior fellow at the hoover institution. he is well-known for the taylor rule, a monetary policy principle that offers guidance on how to tinker with interest rates to control inflation. taylor served as undersecretary of the treasury during the george w. bush administration and was part of the council of economic advisers. specimen so much for being here today. -- thank you so much for being here today. special thanks to mohammed el- erian and mr. taylor for flying from california. i want to kick off the panel with you. you coined the term, the new normal in 2009. your outlook for the economy has been dead on. how much longer is this economy going to remain in the new normal? >> let me take you back to 2009 when the new normal concept came out. the idea was to signal that i
, but what is the risk of the social fabric of america beginning to fray? >> it is fraying. it is fraying because we started out with social inequality and now it is getting worse. it is getting worse because of the policies we are pursuing to try and restart our economy. if the fed is the only policy making entity in play today in washington, not by choice but by necessity, the fed can only act using indirect policies. it cannot invest in infrastructure. it cannot change the tax code. it has to convince people to do things. how does it convince people? the idea is very simple. you make asset markets unofficially high. the wealth effect, people feel richer. maybe companies will invest more who owns financial assets? you have this irony in using imperfect policy by necessity, you make income inequality worse. >> ms. bair, do you believe that this is contributing to the widening of income inequality? >> i do. it is not trickle down. it has resulted in financial asset inflation. that benefits people who own financial assets who are the wealthier folks. there are not quality jobs. the vast ma
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
by french revolutionaries and the a were influencing people in america. there were rumors that cities would be burned. it was terrorism they were anticipating. for example, the opposition party, the democratic republican party was very enthusiastic about the french and some of the ideals of the french revolution. >> jefferson in particular. >> this is where they begin to go in different directions. also, some of the press is very vehement in their criticism of the administration. so they muzzled the press and said that this is probably the thing that john adams is most criticized for. abigail, i believe, supported john. abigail was even more vehement during i think she is even more conservative than john during that time. >> the upshot of this, the people who were breaking the alien and sedition acts -- >> you could be jailed. >> it was said that the press made things up. he had no standards. it was not the they were supporting the french, but they were making up stories that were not the truth europe adams was very seriously worried about this. jefferson -- that were not the truth. adams w
at the time and what it was like to be america's first lady and not just the wife of an american mr. an american minister, but to be a wife and a daughter. >> the thing that i always think about with abigail is the relationship, the partnership. without abigail, there is no john. without john, there is no abigail.>> john is important to history. >> yes. with the support she provided to him in europe, in the presidency, in the vice presidency, she was so trustworthy that she could to -- take care of things. so he could go off and be this great public person, which was exactly what she wanted.>> to our guests, our thanks for helping us understand more about the life and legacy of america's second first lady abigail adams. thank you for your time. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> wednesday night, we continue our encore of the first season ladies," with dolly madison. , september 9, a look at the life of edith roosevelt. our website has a special section on the first ladies, including "welco
. this is true as much of the recent past, as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end from having some passing people to talk to you about joe kennedy, including large numbers of kennedys, i must prefer working from written documents to listen to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined what they know, what they think they know because someone told them for what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct passion of the past that is so close to us, and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify them to move beyond the clichÉd about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers. esp
in the pool of daca applicants. those from central america, asia and europe on the other hand are underrepresented in the pool of applicants so far and for these three groups this underrepresentation is also statistically significant. so just a reminder here i'm going through sort of the top line findings and this discussion hopefully will unpack some of the receipts why. okay. so we can move beyond national origins and this is where i do apologize because this should have been removed because this is all about stroking academic ego but this is just a multivariant regression analysis. this is a way to take all of the data, analyze the data while controlling for other factors. now, underrepresentation is one thing and new or bolstered outreach to those particular national origin groups can correct that underrepresentation but are all groups experiencing daca sort of equally? well another way we can address that question it look at denials. so when we think about approvals versus denials, we can ask ourselves, are any particular groups disproportionately being denied? so this ma
states and said south and latin america which was very unusual for a. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a year and grow , very proud -- war of the fact. making the best of the best situation. then once she married is was a way to escape both the bush justice of the children, or have some of the onset of the weaknesses and in some way perhaps also a form of birth control pill is a catholic church would not have allowed any. >> she even maintained her schumer. the early 1970's. if i had known it was a competition and might have had more than nine permit. >> happy to surpass. >> one trip when they went to russia and then it was unusual for women. >> 1937, as of this would have been prior. >> her son in the apple of her eye had guns hang fund. -- the epitome of a capitalist and he said, you need to know the ways of future. socialism may be one of them. absolutely for the year between reps cool and when he went to harvard he went to london to study and then spent some time in the soviet this well fact-finding and would report back. so taken with his report that she decided t
and they're shouting at us, australia, with the guns to our heads, we shouted back, no, america, america. i had thrown my passport at them. i was born here in washington, dc and they would kick me in my stomach and as others joined the firing squad i would say, america, america. at some point they took the guns from our heads, we believe because we were from the same country their weapons were from. they would have to pay a price for killing us they never had to pay for killing the timor yeast, a red cross jeep pulled up. we were able to get into it. the driver of the red cross jeep picked up the timorees man who was in a sewer ditch next to us and everytime the soldiers beat him, he would put up his hands in the prayer sign and they would smash the butts of their rifles into this face. we drove as a museum -- human mass to to the hospital. at the hospital, when we got out, the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. ... people can march in streets here, and they saw that that day. and that deepened their despair. we went hiding. we knew we had to get out of the country. we have
of america. he knew what japan was getting into and as he told the individual at the time, he said that we could guarantee a tough fight for the first six months but i have no confidence after that. it is important to know that he is a gambler. he played billiards and roulette and dejong and it almost did not matter what the game was as long as it had a gambling component. he often threatened to resign to become a full-time professional gambler. that is how good he was. although i'm sure they didn't take his threats seriously, it is important to understand that his love of gambling affected his military strategy and influenced his thinking. that is why he has a mixed record. he was a fascinating character, nonetheless. when he was young and serving aboard japan's naval flagship during the japanese and russian war, the deck bluff and he was severely injured by an explosion. if you look at this photograph here, you can see the stars peppering his face from the shrapnel. he was pretty self conscious, which is one reason they were often airbrushed out of his official photographs and he also lo
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20